About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN 25
CSPAN2 20
FBC 6
CNN 5
CNNW 5
KCSM (PBS) 2
WETA 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
KQED (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 70
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)
. making demands on their government, demands for transparency and accountability. if they do not find alternatives, they could be in trouble. if you have a business, to help us solve this saudi arabia problem, you would be in a competitive position. this is not a theory. it works. i had the opportunity last week to congratulate ceo of electro- motor diesel, now part of the caterpillar company, on a contract for locomotives. a little over two years ago, a previous executive was in my office bemoaning the reality that he was about to lose a competitive bid to another country based on costs. even though we have had provided advocacy to the ministry on its behalf. he was sure that the contract award would be on price. when i asked him for his value proposition, he had little to offer other than our locomotives are better than theirs. they lost. fortunately, the saudi arabians agreed to take the winning entry on approval basis for two years. so they had a chance. a new team came forward and we discussed at length what it takes to win. the principles are fairly straightforward. first, find
end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints that are traditional media do. and i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others. when they have classified information that they think would it -- jeopardize information to believe they bring the fact that they have that information to the government and say, look, make the case for why we should no
. when we have to turn down customers because of decision by government to interfere and make a regulation that says that we have to go in and, you know, stop cars from delivering the type of service they need to get in, and you know, people right now, with bad transit you have to travel. you can't stop people at the doorway and the limousine service is very important for customers. melissa: no, absolutely. you heard tom kloza was on right before you. he was saying a lot of this has to do with panic. i'm out there on the street, the gas situation is not about panic. it is about cars literally running out of gas because there isn't any around. give me an anecdote. what is going on? >> it's true. cars are running out. driving around for miles and miles trying to find a gas station. literally having to pull over, because they can't drive anymore. we're having, literally 30% of our fleet down as of last night. this morning we're turning away customers. we're telling no, we can't provide service to you. it's a real problem. it's not just, it is not imaginary. it is real. melissa: f
money. you make your money working for the government are doing your money -- you and your husband make almost three and $50,000 a year. my income is earned by having companies that employ workers in this a. i think the bigger question is, you've got something hidden in your to secret family trusts that you won't disclose and you haven't disclosed. so ms. hochul, ladies and those to secret family trusts ask because i've a feeling they may be something you don't want the voters to know. hochul: you've got to be kidding me. give it a pretty big you're the one who has refused to put your personal taxes on one because you said the voters basically were not smart enough to understand. i think that's pretty derogatory toward voters personally. but you're the one, mitt romney has 300 page tax return but even he put his out there. we all felt at that financial disclosure. big deal. i don't have to do it. why won't you tell us where your assets are, the question is what are you hiding? all of us can even mitt romney and other people running for office have done. why won't you, chris? collins: i
, not the u.s. government, because i'm about to hammer them. we do not have the kind of leadership that required to have coalitions put together to deal with this situation. it is a soft power or hard power. and it may not happen properly anytime in the near future your remember that caveat. now, the other day i was reading through a book by save the children. it's about the children of syria. and if you haven't read this book and you want to understand what's happening in syria, i recommend you read it. but i assure you, you will feel very uncomfortable on page one. there are costs involved with the situation that could go on for generations, not just for now. generations. think about the children are going through now and how they will think about the west. the international community, their arab brothers, the reins, the russians, the chinese, the united states, and just about everyone else. even if this might be over in the next year or so, it will definitely not be over for those children. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. ambassador? >> i agree with most of what i heard from
. host: is a short amount of your district, the sixth district, talk about what the federal government is point to do and whether there will be enough funding for the damage out there in new jersey and up and down the east coast. guest: we have got to make sure there is enough funding. this is like to take emergency appropriations bill to pay for. there's not enough money for disaster relief. there's got to be an emergency appropriation. i think it has to be robust enough to cover all of this. it is going to be very costly. just looking at where i was yesterday, yesterday i went to bellmawr, new jersey to look at the damage. you have all of the sand that washed away from the beach. you are talking about beach replenishment. and all of the damage to homes. some people have insurance. but for those who do not, or if their insurance is not complete enough to provide insurance, the federal government has got to help out. and i am certain that we will pass an appropriations bill to cover this, but it will be in the billions of dollars. i hope our colleagues on both sides of the aisle unders
. >> a court in milan has convicted former prime minister berlusconi of defrauding the italian government of millions of yours in unpaid taxes. remedy court gave him a four- year term and said berlusconi had shown a natural capacity for crime. berlusconi's lawyers condemned the verdict and promised to appeal. >> berlusconi has dominated italian politics for nearly 20 years, perhaps in anticipation of the jail term. earlier this week, berlusconi said he would not contest the next election. although given a four-year sentence, and was immediately reduced to one year due to an amnesty law from 2006. berlusconi was also fined 10 million euros and then form -- from holding public office for 10 years. the head of the media said television empire was accused of running a complex tax evasion system in the 1990's. prosecutors said berlusconi was part of a scheme to purchase broadcast rights to film through offshore companies and then inflate the cost to reduce taxes owed. the former prime minister will remain free until italy's appeal system is exhausted, a process that could be quite lengthy. >>
i am not confident that there is a measure that the government can take to make everything more secure. what i do believe would be possible is there could be a better way to incentivize. because right now when we heard dimitri with the oil company ceo, he has said, i have these regulatory issues. how long can i try to contain this before i bring others and? >> maybe we can keep this under the rug. there is a lot happening there. have you incentivize them to share information. >> i have to jump in. okay. i'm just a girl trying to protect a network share. the thing is i don't believe that this is the right model. i think crime is a better model. if you look at crime now, people say, well, you pour more money into it, then are we going to reduce crime. if we have more policemen, is that going to reduce crime? if you have laws, regulations won't stop it, laws won't stop it, it is just vigilant. vigilance about citizens protection and the way that they need to comment having law enforcement in the right places in order to best leverage a limited number of resources. and i think we re
financial company and to complete the government at divestiture the idea would be that the enterprise could be recapitalized by creditors and the financial company receiving a combination of cash, equity or debt in satisfaction of the claims against the receivership. the strategy has the advantage of returning the company to private ownership and insurers as possible avoiding an even bigger too big to fail company. it also would likely promote the stability in the financial markets of the mandates. a few words about international cooperation because that's certainly been a big issue in connection with how we going to do this? there is a lot of work done. certainly in the recent financial crisis that has been increased awareness on the degree to which these large financial companies operate across the borders. and so, obviously the resolution has to be coordinated internationally to reduce the risk of disruption. so, there is no current international insolvency framework to resolve a global the systemically important financial institution in a comprehensive manner so we really need to do adv
that it is going to the israel government. >> you're calling us from missouri. in a little while we look good to the missouri senate race debate. that is a debate between clearly paschal -- claire macaskill and tod akin. what they're using is the big issues in that race? caller: a lot people are mad. they think that we can do better with our government, like rummy promises. -- like to make money promises. yes been in business. he knows how to make it work. i completing to the american people that they get him a chance. i have had a full-time job in a part-time job trying to make it as a single mother. also, it is a feeling in faith. host: how is it influence your vote in the senate race? caller: i'm going to go republican. that is the way i am feeling. you know,. host: here to give us more insight is it politics reporter at the st. louis post dispatch. thank you for joining us. give us a sense of what is going on in missouri. this has been very intense. guest: the race has tightened. clear and taught a again have been hiding for a month now. after he won he made a very controversial comment t
is a former government hacker, who is now on the good side, a security specialist, one of the great hackers in the world, he last year decided to explore the vulnerabilities in the iphone. he found a vulnerability in the iphone that when he deployed it the right way, and this was for a contest, it enabled him to take over a portion of that iphone. industrial control computers are on a lot of systems, water systems, electric grids and so on. last year, a disgruntled hacker abroad went into a water system in south houston, texas, and got control of those computers. the list goes on and on. there are hacks of google, security firms. there are millions of attacks, literally millions of attacks around the world and intrusions on computer systems every day. probably the most phenomenal attack involves a warm called stuxnet. in that case, the u.s. government, i think working with israel, but the united states government to felt -- the u.s. government develop a computer warned that went into the nuclear processing facilities in iran and disrupted those computers. >> it was developed by the u.s. gov
oversight and government reform committee. gentlemen, welcome to chicago tonight. it's good to have you here. >> thank you. good to be here. >> moderator: you're both on record as saying you'd be open to raising revenue as part of a plan to balance the budget. congressman dold, your opponent says he'd support 70% in cuts versus 30% in new revenues. what percentage breakdown would you support? dold: i'm not so sure i have a percentage breakdown. i have worked with my colleagues on the other side of the aisle in the only bipartisan budget that's come to the floor in a generation and, frankly, we need to be talking about how we can get folks together, republicans and democrats alike. running an organization, i certainly know that the only successful organizations are those that come together and actually solve problems and have some sort of compromise. >> moderator: but in terms of a compass point, you were asked recently would you accept the $1 tax increase for $10 in cuts, and you said yes. dold: sure. >> moderator: somewhere between that and 70/30, i mean, just as a general proposition? dold
on it now i will do nothing. that will be protected. that's between the government and the them. that's protected. but all i had some plans that will save it for the long haul and i will end at that. you're very gracious with time. smith: de leggitt rebuttal time? >> moderator: how much you need? how about 15 seconds. smith: the most radical proposals in the congress and the senate any way that a grand total of 16 votes was the so-called rand paul plan. the rhine and budget has all kind of problems because when it comes to medicare, this is a basic debate about ending the medicare guaranteed benefit preserving my record indicates not just preserving but strengthen. >> moderator: monica ag you have the last question. >> because of the economic downturn, the education in our country has had to squeeze from every angle, city budgets for education have dropped, state budgets have dropped, so it makes it challenging most experts would say to believe our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field with other students around the world because the bigger class size is no
are simple. the candidates have jaundice for a conversation about the level of government in our lives. we have asked them to stay on point. the candidates can talk to one another but i will be managing the time is spent on a particular topic. we will have the freedom to move the conversation along. each candidate will have a closing statement along with the 90 statements. -- 90 seconds. there are no opening statements. we flipped a coin. we will begin with night -- tonight with tammy baldwin. i will ask the both the same kind of question. about your portrayal in this campaign. you haven't portrayed as an extreme liberal -- have been portrayed as an extreme liberal. the national journal said you have either one of the most were the most liberal voting records in the house. the late george mcgovern said he was a proud liberal. what are you willing to embrace that definition? >> in wisconsin, we have a tradition of progressivism. it means something here. sometimes the words of liberal and conservative have lost their meaning at the nationalist level. the me tell you what i mean. -- let met t
government and newspapers, without one or the other, he would have preferred to do with newspapers and without government. then he got elected and began to claim he was misquoted. from that, zocalo said big questions may lot of different perspectives. we have re-different people here -- three people here from different parts of the country, different backgrounds. they're all journalists. they are all people who have looked at a wide variety of topics in their work, and have among the topics they have looked at, are the media itself and specifically questions about how we keep a check on power, keep a check on government. you will hear from all three of them. i will introduce each of them as i ask the questions. immediately to my right is bernardo ruiz. his most recent film "reportero," is an incredible film if you have not seen it, it follows a reporter at an embattled mexican news weekly reporting on organized crime and corrupt officials. the film was completed and toward mexico and the human rights watch film festival and will air january 7, 2013 on pbs. he also produced two docu
. it emphatically states in there that i will do nothing. it will be protected. that's between the government banned them. -- and them. there are some plans in there that will save it for the long haul. i will end it there. have been gracious with time. >> do you need a rebuttal? 15 seconds. >> the most radical proposal in the senate that a grand total of 16 votes and it was the rand paul budget. tom smith said it was a good plan. when it comes to medicare, this is a basic debate about ending the medicare benefits. my records indicate that voted to not just preserve it does strength and it. >> monica, the last question. >> because of the economic downturn, the education in our country have had their budgets dropped. it makes it challenging, most would say come to believe that our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field on around the world because of bigger class sizes, fewer books, less time with quality teachers. how would you improve education? mr. smith, you would suggest eliminating the department of indication altogether. is that the right plan for this moment? -- the
. we have the details. >>> a government aud slams half a billion dollars in stimulus for green jobs. i say our government dollars are wasted but of course there is somebody to disagree with me. >> bakthrough in video messaging hopes to be the next big thing. entrepreneur behind the game changing technology is here to explain. even when they say it's not it is always about money messa: so first let's take a look at the day's maet headlines. a rough-and-tumble week for stocks ending a on a quiet note. better than expected u.s. third quarter gdp data could knot offset worries about corporate earnings the dow eked out a gain of three points. good year was one of the biggest losers wi shares tumbling more than 10%. the tire-maker missed third quarter estimates driven by weakness in europe. one bright spot was expedia. shar soared 15%. they posted strong third quarter earnings fueled by a sharp rise in hotel bookings. >>> now to our top story. some people are calling it "frankenstorm". others call it a nor'easter-cane combination hurricane, nor'easter snowstorm or nightmare. if you live on t
] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the federal government is closed today as hurricane sandy is making landfall along the east coast. most of the schools in the washington area are closed. numerous commercial flights grounded. the d.c. and new york city metro services have stopped altogether. the new york stock exchange and the nasdaq have halted all possiblyday and possib tomorrow. many of the campaign events that we are planning to cover today have been cancelled due to the storm. president obama is cutting back on his campaign appearances today. he was to appear with bill clinton in florida this morning. instead he will be in washington monitoring the storm from the white house. mitt romney is in the midwest today with stops in three battleground states, starting with an event in ohio. then he's headed to dive and por -- davenport, iowa, and then wisconsin. we will have live coverage of governor romney in ohio, set to start at 11:50 eastern. we are scheduled to have live coverage of a rally for the president in youngstown, ohio. he was supposed to appear
think that there is going to be a mentality to get the government spending any money at all because -- i would agree to this point if there is not enough money i think we could drive more efficient cars and we could change the power plants but if there isn't a profit of changing to natural gas, companies won't do it. they are not going to lose money to change their power plant over to natural gas. the afton de subsidize. i think it is a sad day because america needs to admit climate change is real and we don't have the money to fix it. i don't have the answer for you but it's ignorant to ignore it. >> host: that's john of the mexico. the presidential candidates were sidelined on the storm from campaigning six days ago before next tuesday's election and here is the headline on the "the washington times" romney balances sympathy and politics to raise donations here's what he had to say about the rally yesterday. i proceed affect people in dayton got up this morning, some went to the grocery store and purchased some things that these families will need, and i appreciate your generosity. it'
personal experience. >> >> you cited the number of people who earn their paychecks from the government. if you turn down the government are we exasperating the problem? >> we have made our economy depended on government. what we need to do to turn this economy around is trim down the drag of government and increase the entrepreneurship and the private sector and when you grow the -- >> do you mean term jobs? >> we need to hold the rate of growth of government to no more than the rate of inflation. jack disagrees. >> we have done it. the average growth since i took office i is -- is 1.7%. we're going back to the administration were our state government headcount. the only administration going back all the way to the administration and it is not to layoffs, it has attrition. no other administration can say that. we will make a move in the right direction. >> we've seen the governor's rec. what about yours? can you tell us about how you were able to create jobs or how you managed? >> it is not the government's roll to create jobs. i have worked with large employers. successful companies.
want to see how your government works directly, c- span is about the only place to go. >> he watches c-span on comcast. c-span, treated by america's cable companies' in 1979 and brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> joe biden posted she economic advisor jared bernstein and murray took part in a debate hosted by the tariff board school of public policy. this is about one hour and 20 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. in 1962, 50 years ago, mike published "poverty in the united states." at the time the american economy was in the golden age of economic prosperity. a rising tide was lifting all boats. the economy had grown rapidly. the wages of most workers have been growing faster than the rate of theinflation. almost no one talked about poverty. book not only change the discourse but the public policy landscape. he wrote "there is a familiar america that has the highest standard of living the world has ever known. that is not change the fact that tens of millions of americans are at this very moment existing at levels of been need those necessary for human de
areas of the government. >> senator, you talked about the fiscal cliff that is looming at the end of december. we have tax cuts that are about to expire, many of them, and we also have, like you were just talking about the trillion sequester cuts. all these things are happening by the end of the year. what do you think congress should do, do you feel like they should leave everything as is? or do you think, do you have any ideas that congress should put in place that you will put forward when you guys go back in next week? >> yeah, i think that the best way to talk about the tax rates is they're what we've had for 10 years. businesses have made their plans predicated on a tax rate. i don't think we should increase the tax rates on anybody. i don't care if you're rich, middle class or poor. we shouldn't divide up people. we should divide people into two sectors. private sector, public sector. i don't want to grow the public sector, i want to grow the private sector. so that means means, leaving as much money in the private sector as possible. i don't want to tax anybody any more to
mitt romney's proposals to cut personal income and corporate taxes, reduce the size of government, roll back regulation and boost energy exploration could generate jobs but only over the long term. moody's analytics estimated that the president's proposed jobs act would have generated 1.9 million jobs through infrastructure projects, the rehiring of public employees, and tax credits. but the bill was blocked in congress. given that. >> it's simply the case that neither candidate has a plan for dealing with the immediate jobs crisis. >> there's not a whole lot of discussion going on about how to promote jobs right now. because what one would normally talk about is more stimulus, either more government spending or more tax cuts. but the deficit situation has now grown so bad that there's just no appetite for further borrowing at this time. >> maya macguineas runs the committee for a responsible federal budget, a bipartisan group that lobbies congress. she says uncertainty about how the government will deal with the deficit and the huge national debt is inhibiting employers from hiring. >>
have a bunch of issues. and what that does is create uncertainty. if the government can go and do what they want regardless of what the lot is -- what the law expert, and the government says coppola -- what the lot is, and the government says, and going to do it and go ahead and sue me. that is as much of the problem as the volume we have seen. the cost of the regulation is inconsistent with the underlying law that was passed by congress, or never even contemplated by congress. co2 is a toxic substance. i cannot imagine anyone who voted for the clean air act who would have suggested that was something that was covered under the definition when they passed that bill. the overriding issue is government run amok because the president is incapable of getting any of the stuff through the congress. you have a president who has decided that we are going to do this on our own. and the media, as we all know, it's certainly not going to go out and hammer him for doing these things. they agree with him for the ones to do. they let him get away with it. it is up to conservatives to try to make the
in better shape than its peers because of the actions of its government. perhaps the most important cause of america's relative health is the federal reserve. ben bernanke understood the depths of the problem early and responded energetically and creatively. the clearest vindication of his actions has been that the european central bank after charting an opposite course for three years with disastrous results, has now adopted policies similar to the fed's, and thus avoided a potential lehman-like clapgz in europe. the leading experts on financial crises argue that the united states is performing better than most countries in similar circumstances in history. consumers are paying down debt, and consumer confidence is at its highest levels since september, 2007. every american recovery since world war ii has been led by housing except this one. but finally, housing is back. two weeks ago, jamie dimon, chief executive of jpmorgan chase, declared that housing had turned the corner and predicted that as a consequence, economic growth in 2013 would be so strong that the fed would have to raise
- span is about the only place to go. -- how your government works directly, then c-span is about the only place to go. >> live coverage for the iowa 4th district u.s. house seat. steve king is running for a sixth term. he is challenged by christie vilsack. their debate is on iowa public television. steve king -- and this special edition of iowa press, from carroll. steve king has been winning reelection by comfortable margins, getting a fifth term with 2/3 of the votes cast two years ago. redistricting may be diluting that republican dominance. that is what democrats kristi ville sec may have been hoping when she moved halfway across the state, declaring candidacy for the congressional seat. she has been traveling the state as i will's the first lady during husband tom vilsack's tenure. both of you are familiar with the format. we are in a different setting. we have an audience and television viewers. they promise to not sure at all. -- not sure at all. the questions will be coming from brett awyworth and kay henderson. >> you said being a woman was not a barrier to run for publi
in such a way that people can be represented in governments in a more effective fashion than they are now. president karzai has been handed a constitution where he rules the whole country. a saint would use that power. he has abused that power. i would like to look into a new constitution that would represent the people in afghanistan better than today. >> time for a new constitution in afghanistan? >> i think that we need to first of all make sure that everybody who has served there in this country, that we recognize they did everything that we asked them to do. in the and they have been asked to help train police forces. much like the national guard, they have been asked to help train them so they can take care of their own country. they need to do that. the sooner we can get out of afghanistan, the better. we need to invite these gentle back to the small communities of this district. we need to build here. we need to build infrastructure here. >> not that you are not saying something important, but i promised you earlier we would get to the farm bill. the prior farm bill has expired fo
of pakistan as if somehow the american government or the american people have something to do with this crazy movie. that was bad policy and bad form. it is why this story goes on and on. i get back to the primary question. why was no one guarding be ambassador? why did they removed the 16- person security team that has -- had requested to stay? it was requested that a security team stay in one of the most dangerous countries in the world. would you like to be the bureaucrat in the state department said, you need to come home because we do not have the money? what i have been pounding home is, four days after the dc-3 was removed, they spent $100,000 to spend money for electric cars that cost the taxpayer 250,000 dollars per car in subsidies. this was a political statement they were making. they wanted to show off for the europeans and say, we are as european as you are. we do not have money to provide for the basic security of an embassy. that is inexcusable. whoever made that decision, the already know that. whoever made those decisions should be fired. >> susan ferrechio from the washingto
and local governments has been outstanding. obviously we are now moving into the recovery phase and a lot of the most severely- affected areas. new jersey, new york have been pounded by this storm. connecticut has taken a big hit. because of some of the work done ahead of time, we have been able to get over 1000 officials in place. we have been able to get supplies, food, medicine, water and emergency generators to ensure hospitals and law enforcement offices are able to stay up and running as their of their responding. we will continue to push as hard as we can to make sure power is up throughout the region, and obviously this is mostly a local responsibility, and the private utilities are going to have to lean forward, but we're doing everything we can to provide additional resources so that we can expedite getting power up and running in many of the communities. there are places around newark, new jersey, where you have 80 percent of the people without power. my instruction has been do not figure out why we cannot do something. i want to figure out how we do something. i want you to cu
- stabilizing influence, and mason governments are facing government. and these opportunists are may be unpredictable. and i was use iraq as an example. there were lots of opportunists and iraq. iran, turkey, saudi arabia, kuwait, nonstate actors all opportunists trying to get finish of a situation or how to set project itself around the world? what does it mean to us as we look for the future conflicts? the character of conflict is changing by the operational environment conflict is change. but in my mind the fundamental nature of work remains the same. that's the struggle to influence populations in governance. that has not changed. so it's how we continue to understand that struggle within the new operational environment and context that we see it. the army has great 237 years ago to defend this nation comes to the interests of states abroad, and in my opinion that imperative has not changed. so as i got a force for the future, the one thing i tell everyone is that we're starting from a position of strength. and why do i say that? because of the army specifically with the most com
opportunists who will try to take advantage of instability and destabilizing influence and nascent governments or failing governments. and these opportunists are maybe unpredictable. and i always use iraq as an example. there's lots of opportunists in iraq. iran, turkey, saudi arabia, kuwait, nonstate actors. all opportunists trying to take advantage of a situation. how does that project itself around the world? what does that mean to us as we look at the future of conflict? the cast of conflict is changing, the operational environment and conflict is changing, but in my mind the fundamental nigh ture of war remains the same. that's the struggle to influence populations and governments. that has not changed. so it's how we continue to understand that struggle within the new operational environment and context that we see it. the army was created 237 years ago to defend this great nation and in my opinion that imperative has not changed. so as i adapt the force for foot ture, the one thing i tell everyone is that we are starting from a position of strength. why do i say that? because the army s
't based on the inalienable right to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness and self-government but the essence of revolution is you have to win. nobody hands you victory in revolution. that is what the war was about but then the war ends and the south has to be reintegrated into the union. but there are all these unreconstructed confederates who still believed they had the better part of the argument and the white race should be supreme in the south, who resent entirely the fact that abolition was imposed on the south but whereas during the civil war they didn't have a vote, didn't have a say and the national government, all of a sudden they do. during war, the rules of democracy were suspended. democracy is based on majority rule. once the war ends democracy kicks back in and so the south has to be reintegrated politically and when grant was nominated for president in 1868 grant was first of all nominee by acclamation of the republican party. grant did not lift a finger on his own behalf. allowed himself to be nominated and allowed himself to be elected. one thing, he didn't g
. that individuals create jobs not government that creates jobs. [applause] . when mitt romney is president he is going to need another united states senator republican nites senator from florida. [applause] how many here have already voted? [applause] and for those of you who vant weak up tomorrow morning and go vote. after you vote for mitt romney go down the ballot a little more and vote for connie mack. can you do that? there are dig differences between senator nelson and myself. he was the deciding vote for obamacare. i voted against obamacare. [applause] senator nelson has voted for higher taxes 272 times. i voted to cut taxes. [applause] senator nelson voted to gut our military. i voted to strengthen our 34il8 tear. military [applause] . a couple of things happen when i beat senator nelson. the second thing that happens is harry reid will no longer control the agenda. [applause] so florida, we're counting on you, we're counting on you to get out there and vote for mitt romney. i'm counting on you to go out and vote for me. together we'll make sure that mitt romney is the next president,
.s. invasion and the toppling of hussein -- pusan -- a secular liberal government that was willing to cede some of its sovereign rights to a foreign power. some claim it's all different now with the islamic republic because the arab awakening, the demonstration effect will work together with sanctions to find the break the back of the islamic republic. but this ignores the fact that the islamic republic sees the arab awakening as hugely positive, hugely positive. iranian policymakers and analysts believe that any arab government, any arab government that becomes at all more representative of its populations beliefs, concerns and policy preferences will, by definition, be less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular t
erupted between government forces and rebel fighters earlier today near a northern military base. a number of anti regime protests have been held across syria, with troops firing tear gas and live rounds to disperse demonstrators in several areas. on thursday, a u.n. spokesperson for secretary- general ban ki-moon said the ceasefire marked a critical juncture for the syrian conflict. >> the secretary general welcomes the reported announcements about a suspension of violence during the eid holiday. obviously, the world is watching to see what will happen on friday morning. it is in everybody's interest, not least the long suffering syrian people, that the guns fall silent to our morning for the eid holiday. >> 21 people are dead across the caribbean, including 11 in cuba, after hurricane sandy slammed the region with heavy rains and powerful winds. the late-season storm hit the bahamas late thursday and is now expected to head for the united states. forecasters are warning the storm could collide with another from canada, creating a potentially devastating hybrid that could ravage parts of
create a perfect storm for stocks. we're going to explain that. >>> does our government now need a secretary of business? president obama thinks so. what about the business community? we're going to get reaction straight from business owners mouths. even when they say it's not, even in this storm, it's always about money melissa: so, starting off tonight, no doubt hurricane sandy will cost a lot of money. it is still going strong, headed right for western new york. let us get the latest on the path from weather.com meteorologist. bernie, what is it getting ready to hit now? >> it is off to the east of pittsburgh. as you mentioned melissa, it is moving northward, when you take a look at storm, look how large it is. it is covering the eastern half of the united states. there is moisture feeding in on the earn end of it from the tropics. that is why we still have so much rain talking about. heaviest rain thankfully east of i-95 corridor through western pennsylvania and back to northwest indiana with this rain. we're not seeing the devastating rain we saw yesterday. pockets of heavy
advantage of this instability in destabilizing influence and nascent governments are failing governments and these opportunists may be unpredictable. i always use iraq as an example. there are lots of opportunists in iraq, iran, turkey, saudi arabia and nonstate actors all opportunists trying to take advantage of the situation. how does that project itself around the world? what does that mean to us as we look at the future of conflict? the operational environment of conflict is changing but in my mind the fundamental nature of war remains the same and that is the struggle to influence populations in governance. that has not changed. so it's how we continue to understand that struggle within the new operational environment and the context we see it. the army was created 237 years go to defend this great nation insecure abroad and in my opinion that appear -- imperative does not change so the one thing i tell everyone you said we are starting from a position of strength and why do i say that? because in the army specifically we have the most combat tested, combat ready experience force we
at the expansion of the government and education. when we separated education out of health, education, and welfare. we have spent more money at education at the federal government level, money that could have been used better at the local levels. we have to look at these duplicative programs. we have got to move away from baseline budget to zero-based budget. >> the gao had a study that counted 33 agencies that are doing the same thing. we need to streamline these agencies. seven are focused on businesses and trade. let's streamline them. we have attacked medicare fraud and abuse. we need to continue to do that, in all government agencies. i spent years going into numerous fortune 500 countries -- companies looking for these inefficiencies. i plan using my government to find this week. >> can either of you give me any numbers? the department of energy? >> close to $85 billion. you are looking at a guy, never been in politics before, and i found three wasteful programs in the government. the combined savings of -- if every single member of the house was going and looking for wasteful programs, thin
grateful to doctor victor cha a professor in government and asian studies and director of asian studies here in georgetown. carol lancaster, our dean of the school of foreign service, and doctor abraham kim, the interim president of the korea economic institute, for making this event possible. were also aren't up with is representative of the department of education, and we thank the department for its recognition of our asian studies program title vi, national resources center for east asia. it's fitting we gather today for this conversation just days before the presidential election. the topic of our discussion will take on increasing importance for our president in the next four years. secretary of state hillary clinton who offered a foreign policy address on this very stage just two weeks ago has written in foreign policy about the growing significance of the u.s. asian relationship. she wrote, one of the most important tasks of american statecraft over the next decade will be to lock in a substantially increased investment, diplomatic, economic, strategic and otherwise in the asia-
two in state to rumor that i was going to be fired. that's the way when you're in government. i'm happy to say to cut it short for the series of crisis early in the administration with the chinese, not only this one, but the visit to the taiwan president and the way taiwan missile crisis we ended up in the following year successfully got the relationship back on track, set up a series of summits between our presidents. so it all ended well. it does underline the pendulum swing you feel in policy terms and in personal career terms. >> thank you. ambassador hill, also, thank you for joining us. coming from denver despite the logistic difficult created by hurricane sandy. the biggest challenge. >> there was no challenge coming in from denver 68 and sunny. [laughter] it's been like that for the last couple of weeks. i don't know what the fuss is. [laughter] no, let me say what a pleasure it is to back hire and thank you so much for putting this together. as i'm looking out in the audience here, i see a lot of people i worked with during the days, and, you know, as we talk about the
message to everyone involved is that we have to take this seriously. the federal government is working effectively with state and local governments. it will be very important that populations in the impacted states take this seriously, listen to your state and local officials. my message to the governors and mayors is that anything they need, we will do it. we will cut through red tape and not get bogged down in a lot of rules. you want to make sure that we are leaning forward into making sure we have the best possible response into what is going to be a big and messy system. crag, which like to add something? >> as the president says, it will come down to achieving those evacuation orders and taking protective measures. get information on how to protect yourself and your families. also, check on your neighbors. this will be a big storm and we need to be there for each other. >> ready.gov, for the general public, if you need to know where to respond, that is where you get that information. but greg is exactly right. what we do in times like this is all together and help each other. the
their power so. melissa: maybe it is something we have to commit to? utilities are regulated by the government and they're told how much they can charge their customers. they don't necessarily have the room for this kind of expense. maybe that is the problem with having regulated businesses. maybe we all have to suck it up as a community and pay the assessment and put these power lines underground? >> you know, really depends geographically i think. each individual community has to take that cost benefit analysis. if storm damage is something that, you know, people are paying a lot for, it may be a idea but there's, other problems with burying them underground. where, you know, they're harder to get to. so when you have some sort of issue like a tree root breaking a line or flooding taking out power, it is can be harder to fix. can take longer to fix. again there is tradeoffs for both systems. melissa: but empirically, power has to go down a lot less frequently when it is underground. have you studied frequency? seems completely predictable. a storm whips through new york state. you know exact
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)